Google Provides Guidance on Right to be Forgotten

GOOGLE RECEIVES 160,000 RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN REQUESTS,

PROVIDES CLARITY ON PROCESS

In discussing the European Court of Justice’s decision on the Right to be Forgotten, it is important to note that it was not addressing proposals to permit users to exit from social media and delete their accumulated content.  Instead, the ECJ was addressing whether to allow people to petition to remove certain items from search listings because they are prejudicial but no longer relevant.  The court held that a data subject’s rights override “as a rule, not only the economic interest of the operator of the search engine but also the interest of the general public in finding that information upon a search relating to the data subject’s name”, unless “that the interference with his fundamental rights is justified by the preponderant interest of the general public in having, on account of inclusion in the list of results, access to the information in question”  C-131/12 Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja Gonzalez (May 13, 2014).

The Opinion has been widely criticized, but Google recently has provided some transparency as to how it processes the more than 160,000 requests with samples of request approved and denied.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.



See CLBR’s Right to be Forgotten Segment with the Future of Privacy Forum’s Jules Polentesky.