CLBR #274: Germany’s Controversial Social Media Hate Speech Law with Andrea Shalal

Germany’s Controversial Social Media Hate Speech Law With Andrea Shalal, Reuters News Service, Berlin LISTEN An Act to Improve Enforcement of the Laws in Social Networks, the “Network Enforcement Act” (better known as “NetzDG” or “Facebook Act”) was passed by the German government in June and went into effect on October 1, 2017.  With fines as…

CLBR #273: Hacking the Vote with Jake Braun

Hacking the Vote with Jake Braun Listen Voting in the United States is under attack.  On Wednesday the Supreme Court will hear arguments on partisan gerrymandering that distorts election outcomes.  Other courts have weighed in our voter suppression efforts designed to reduce voting by disfavored segments. At the July DEFCON conference, there was a “Voting Machine…

CLBR #271: Hamilton 68 and Securing Democracy

Hamilton 68 and Securing Democracy With Laura Rosenberger and Jamie Fly Laura Rosenberger and Jamie Fly from the German Marshall Fund’s Alliance for Securing Democracy discuss their latest project – Hamilton 68 a real-time dashboard that provides a near real-time look at Russian propaganda and disinformation efforts online.  The dashboard gets its name from Federalist Paper No. 68…

CLBR #270: Venkat, Data Scraping and Daily Stormer

CLBR #270: Venkat, Data Scraping and Daily Stormer Focal Law Group’s Venkat Balasubramani joins us to discuss two recent developments: Dating Scraping after the hiQ Labs Decision The decision in hiQ Labs, Inc. v LinkedIn, Inc., No. 3:17-cv-03301-EMC (N.D. Cal. Aug. 14, 2017) in which the court enjoined LinkedIn from blocking access to publicly available…

Does Anybody Read Terms and Conditions?

Time and again, someone pulls a prank getting consumers to agree to outrageous things that are included in the terms and conditions and without fail consumers rush to claim the benefit without reading the terms. 2010 – Gamestation In 2010, UK video game e-tailer Gamestation changed its terms and conditions to add the language below as…

Court Narrows, Restricts DOJ Warrant on Inaugural Protest Site

As we reported earlier, the Justice Department served a warrant concerning disruptj20.org on its hosting provider DreamHost seeking records of all visitors to the site, including all communications.  Rather than negotiate, the Justice Department moved to compel and DreamHost opposed the motion asserting that In essence, the Search Warrant not only aims to identify the political…